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Experience Rendering

A volunteer describes an incident they experienced -- something embarrassing, funny, puzzling, etc. -- to the whole group. The joker asks questions to clarify details and verify understanding. Then, the joker asks for volunteers to enact the scene. They are free to improvise in any way they like.

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One Voice

I got this from Kani Club, the improvisation school in Tokyo. It is a great "Yes, and..." game.

Pairs or trios (daunting to do in larger groups, but could be done with practiced players).

The idea is for the players to speak a sentence simultaneously without knowing what the sentence will be ahead of time, relating the sentence to some physical action or pantomime.

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John Cage's Ten Rules

From the great Open Culture website. http://www.openculture.com/2014/04/10-rules-for-students-and-teachers-po...

These rules can be used in many ways:

  • As one big prompt for a writing activity;
  • As individual prompts for a writing activity;
  • As prompts for role plays or speeches;
  • As propositions to debate...

They are great to use for thinking about innovation, creativity, education, any kind of self-directed work.
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RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for a while.

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Loud and Proud - variations

The game Loud & Proud is designed to played as a rapid-fire competitive matching game. http://store.toolboxfored.org/loud-proud/

It can also be played:

  • As prompts or seeds for making speeches or sermons. One card: if you draw "Organic food is...", you have to improvise a speech on organic food (for or against, or other). Two cards (matching symbols): if you draw "Corporation" and "A Democracy" you have to improvise a speech that relates the two concepts.
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Our better (worse) selves

This is an idea for an improvisational variation on the Love, Hate, Need activity.

Once people have identified what they Love, Hate, Need, Have, Want, Fear, and Hope, the joker hands out three cards on which are written one of the categories (love, hate, etc) to random players.

The players think for a moment, then must improvise a short (2minute or so) scene in which they act out the thing they (love, hate, need...), interacting with the others on that basis.

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Our She-roes

In the 1980's in NYC I first heard someone use the term "she-roes" to emphasize the role of women in history and society. Not being so interested in the concept of "heroes" -- I believe with Debs that people have waited too long for some Moses to lead them out of bondage, waiting for a Joan of Arc to lead us out is equally problematic -- I didn't think much about the term. But it stayed in my mind, like an advertising jingle or a virus. The fact is, I use figures like Debs to orient myself, to represent my aspirations, to express that which I dream of being in some way.

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Ten Second Objects

Adapted from "Ten Second Objects" on the Drama Resource website (http://dramaresource.com/games/warm-ups/ten-second-objects) The original activity is great as is:

"Divide everyone into small groups (4-6). Call out the name of an object and all the groups have to make the shape of that object out of their own bodies, joining together in different ways while you count down slowly from ten to zero. Usually every group will find a different way of forming the object. Examples could be: a car, a fried breakfast, a clock, a washing machine, a fire."

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That's how I feel.

Adapted from "Busca tu cancion" in 101 juegos musicales. See also I second that (e)motion.

The joker writes down three to 10 emotions on index cards, two cards per emotion. (One set of three if you have an odd number of participants.) There should be as many cards as participants.

Shuffle the cards, keeping them face down, and have people pick a card, keeping it hidden from others.

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Argument Clinic

In this activity a "client" enters an Argument Clinic like the one in the famous Monty Python sketch.

As in the original, one person is the client, the other the Arguer. Also as in the original, there is a time limit.

The objective is simple: to argue just for the sake of arguing. No need to repeat the Monty Python sketch, just feel free to be disagreeable, contentious, contrary.

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The Flattery Clinic: Client enters room. Greets flatterer. Flattery ensues. Time limit.

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